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on a weapon. also, in the south i remember reading during the civil rights period where they were hosing people down with water and the water also had a lethal impact. so i am just saying that these weapons sound, well we are not using a gun or actual bullets. but it does not actually necessarily, i am not convinced that it necessarily always takes away the lethal aspect. and i think that we have plenty of examples where people of color and low income working people have particularly been victimized by that and there was even that incident here at the theatre where that young man was brandishing another little, i don't know, he was not brandishing a gun was killed. so, i'm just afraid that if then, the option comes to you as a taser that that is where the people will go automatically. instead of having like you said, the slow down, think more. whatever. i'm not, you know, and since tasers do have a lethal, there is a possibility of that and i'm just not... i just wish that the conversation were really different here. >> i agree, i don't disagree with what you are saying and certainly we
that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so special, is that it's a legacy t
community activists, civil rights activists, that looked like me, that looked like many of us. and then in the newspapers i saw two asians and they were speaking always passionately about asian american civil rights. well, they were professor ling chee wang and henry durham. and when i was actually quite despairing, i was quite despairing, it was coming down it a crucial vote in 2007 and then 2008 for the college board to support this campus, they came to the fore, they organized the community, the community rose up probably one of the first few times in the history of the chinese community in san francisco, they rose up from the ground and they said, we want this campus, we're fighting for this campus and you better vote for this campus, and guess what, we passed it and we got the campus. so this campus has been built and raised and all of us community activists, ling chee wang, all you old-timers, we built it for current generations and generations as yell yet unborn. our forefathers came hear to build the railroads. they came hear to build the railroads but really to build
on the issue of civil rights. to support us as councilmembers and the public to know, educate what are our rights. how you make your right to be heard. that's been a wonderful source of support. i will say to my colleagues, to the public, if you have any question about disability access in san francisco, call the mayor's office on disability. i cannot go without saying, it starts from the top. you have the mayor's office on disability. this is an administrative department, funded by the mayor. the mayor gets to check off on the budget. for the three mayors i've had the pleasure to work for, mayor brown, mayor newsom and now mayor lee, they make sure that we have the funds that we need to pursue disability access, that is vital. that is from the top. what we get to do as councilmembers, i'm trying to promote people stepping forward to apply as a council member in the future. we get to try to bridge some of the gaps that ms. jacobson herself did today. across the bay. she sees a need, she tries to bridge the gap. sometimes we need to be angry. that's okay. if we come with respec
've considered and housing for broadly and civil rights more broadly. >> i will use an analogy. i was raised in the country. elephant needed to have a pen, and also a stable, you would ask someone where can i get these facilities. you certainly wouldn't expect that person to direct you to a beehive. and a beehive is where worker bees live. and a stable is where you have larger groups of people that could possibly be there. and since, you know, it's been decided that, you know, oftentimes elephants can't live in beehives, that i suggest that perhaps a beehive isn't as valuable to a city that needs an elephant pen. thank you. >> president chiu: thank you. >> i'm going to be using the overhead. this is my son. can i use the overhead? >> president chiu: sfgov-tv. august 14, 2006. i just want to sayç&%( [ that we talking about violence versus nudity. i'm not bringing that up. "k about my child seeing nudity, but i'm worried about them seeing guns and i'm also -- we can continue -- we continue to be ignored as mothers and fathers. every year, every day, every holiday, every birthday, we are ignor
knowing what their civil rights are in terms of their housing. >> chair: thank you. cochair james, and program administrator -- >> i have a two-part question. one part is about the desk clerks and having someone who listen to you if you have a complaint. the complaint goes to management? they know they are trained to de escalate situation? i don't know about the training that desk clerks would have at sros. >> i think that the short answer is, that depends. a lot of nonprofit housing providers have their own training and standards to what desk clerks are trained in. yes, there are nonprofit-run sros, who have well-trained desk clerks. the vast majority are private buildings. they're not huge buildings that are very apparent. that could be 3-4 floors abouve a restaurant. that's just the person hired by the property manager, or have some sort of agreement for trade for work. and the function of that person is often to buzz people in or call 911. we are looking at raising the bar to where some of the training levels are at some of the nonprofit buildings. we have technical p
're not fighting for a civil right. i don't want gay people to be nude in public. i don't want straight people to be nude in public, not in my neighborhood and i resent very much this is an issue whether you're a prude or a homo phobe. thanks. >> thank you. next speaker. >> my name is leonard and a resident of the castro and i am happy to have an opportunity to talk to you about the what is called nudity in the cast ro. i am a supporter of nudity. i was an art student and drawing live models since i was a teenager. i go to nude beaches both gay and straight. when i have been to nude beaches with families i find it sweet and endearing. however in the castro i don't believe it's nudity. i believe it's exhibitionism and the issue is for it to function for the exhibitionists they need to cohop without the consent of other people and to me this is not unlike -- even though i believe in the live and let live and it extends too far and when you co-op other people because they specifically do not consent to be exposed to and it's unfair. and like i support people to listen to whatever music and w
home to free spirits, codify intolerance and the fact that some people are offended reduced the civil right scptsd liberties that we have here and you need to consider the slippery slope you're creating this ban. >> thank you very much. thank you for your work. next speaker. >> good morning supervisors. i am andrew thompson. born and raised in san francisco. 50 years old. i am probably older than you. >> not by much. >> okay. well, both my parents came to this country -- well, i will focus on my mother. she came with her family to escape what was happening in italy with mussolini and about the time i was born in 62 about the time that -- about the time that people were fleeing to the suburbs i asked my mother why aren't we leaving? and she said "i want my children to be raised in the city". back then i grew up in westportal. took the streetcar through the tunnel and i was going to school at seven in the morning just as the castro was winding up their evening, and saw all kinds of things that my mother may not have agreed with, but trusted in the fact that we could go throug
you for the support. although we're finding out in this city a lot of people civic and civil rights are being cut back on. we hope you, the board of supervisors, will be like the board of supervisors who brought forth the medical marijuana that now 25 states enjoy. supervisors to create codes and sros will be coming here december 4. you know sros, you talk about domestic violence, you talk about homophobia, racism. it's inside now. people want to get up from the sheets and run to the street, whether they naked or not. you know the naked truth is that we really want you guys to do what chris daly did. he's the only one that built apartments on the corner of bank burger king. the united states two weeks ago we voted for the president. two weeks today. they emo he that the -- know the united states politicians are working three days a week and no times for the citizens. we don't want you to reflect that. i want to remember you board of supervisors. when ross was the supervisor here you only making 33,000. we voted that youz/( -w would me over 115 so that you could do the work -- to san
issuu act on that it can backfire in lots of different ways. i am concerned about civil rights, i'm concerned about free speech, i'm concerned about just changing san francisco's style and how we are as a city. and it's something that's very troubling to me to see that. we're a city that actually had -- the publication of city life that naked lunch came out there was a ban about that. the city looks at free speech and expression, we're a beacon of light to other places around the country and sometimes there's weirdness about how we express ourselves but i think that is what is great about san francisco. i have something teed up that i was saving for before, for chris daly when he used the f word in the board chambers but i think this is more appropriate. catch-22. and think it expresses some of the absurdity of this that we have in the backdrop of world war ii where people are killing each other, the inconsequential nudity that is before the general is sh something that is quite meaningless over all. >> why aren't you wearing clothes, captain? >> don't wanna. >> what do you mean y
and when and when we wear it. i was born nude and public nudity is a civil right. thank you. >> thank you. next speaker. >> hi. i am tommy. i have lived in the castro for 21 years. i have been a activist for years and 61 years old and i mention that because i remember a time when there were controversies about gay men and drag queens gathering in public spaces because people were offended by gay men who were drag queens in public spaces, offended and some of the things that are said here it was said about us and i was one those were offended by. they were offended by the sight of me in woman's clothing so pardon me for not feeling sympathetic and i was the object of that when i came out and also in san francisco i remember a time when we tried to set up shelters for homeless youth in the castro and i was involved with that and people at the meetings said the same thing. they were offended by homeless queer youth. business people said it was driving away business that our youth was homeless and no one was doing anything because they had no where to go. these are the same arguments.
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just some follow up questions. did you ever get a response from the mayor on your letter? >> no, we did not. >> and any of the staff in >> no. >> i think that the letter was actually really well done and it is well documented and there are a number of citations in here, do you recall what i read to commander ali, right now, referencing how it looks to be when tasers are involved in working with people who have mental health i
-- if you would like additional information about the office of civil complaints as i mentioned earlier, senior investigator eric baltazar is here in the audience >> thank you, director hicks. any questions for the director? >> before we call our next all right, which is commission reports we have representative from supervisor mars office, if you could please come forward. >> good evening everyone. i just wanted to welcome everyone here to the redmond district. supervisor mar couldn't be here. we wanted to thank the police commission and the chief and empfor your wonderful work and we want to also welcome the captain. we have been working closely with captain ferrigno since june. it's been a great relationship and very happy to see some of the faces of our residents here. but we just want to thank everyone here today and we want to continue working closely and we know that crime has been down recently with the robbery in august, the captain did a very quick response. it was outstanding. media did good coverage and the school was secured and we just want to thank you for your great wo
on the same but we put them on it and you're probably in the next genraition of those radios right now and by the way -- there was a man here who preceded the mayor. it was then called the chief administrative officer and rudy rothenberg and incredible civil servant and i worked with him on this building. in fact i drew this building. i had architecture work as a midship man and if i find it i'm going to give it to you. we also as a result of that we subsumed the department of public health ambulance into the fire department and should have been done years ago and we centralized 911 upstairs. it was a great ride. in addition to the people i mentioned there were scores of others that helped me to succeed kronenberg was one of these people to help me when the political system was going on and i am particularly indebted to the usual suspects, the san francisco suspects who come forward when you have problems and help you to fix them, and i will end with that because they make a difference, and i will end with that, and i brought something with me i want to show you. that's the emer
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)